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Displaying: Sunday, Sep 24 for UNC-EXPLORER Early Morning  -  Morning  -  Afternoon  -  Evening
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Story of India : Beginnings

India's famous "unity in diversity." Using all the tools available to the historical detective -- from DNA to climate science, oral lore, ancient manuscripts, archaeology and exploration of the living cultures of the subcontinent -- Wood takes viewers from the tropical heat of South India to the Ganges plain and from Pakistan and the Khyber Pass out to Turkmenistan, where dramatic archaeological discoveries are changing the view of the migrations that have helped fashion Indian identity. The episode begins long before recorded history, with the first human journey out of Africa. In the tropical backwaters of Kerala, Wood finds survivals of human sounds and rituals from a time before language. In Tamil Nadu, the latest DNA research takes him to a village where everyone still bears the genetic imprint of those first "beachcombing incomers" -- the "first Indians" who went on to populate the rest of the world, excluding Africa. Wood investigates India's "first civilization" -- the lost cities of Harappa and Mohenjo-Daro in today's Pakistan -- and the mystery of their collapse, which Wood speculates may have been due to massive and far-reaching climate change. He also covers the "Age of Heroes" in the time of the great Indian epic, the Mahabharata. Throughout, this colorful and exciting film is full of the sights, sounds and people of today's India. Wood ends the episode among a vast crowd of pilgrims at the festival of Holi in Mathura in northern India. Covered from head to foot in colored powder, he tells his viewers, "This is just the beginning!"

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History Detectives

Sideshow Babies - A Colorado woman has a silver baby cup engraved "Patricia - 1933. A Century of Progress Chicago." She hopes this 1933 Chicago World's Fair souvenir can unlock the mystery of her mother's unusual start in life. Family lore holds that the Chicago Public Health Board took premature Patricia from her shoebox cradle at home and put her in an incubator at the 1933 Chicago World's Fair. Why were babies exhibited at the fair? HISTORY DETECTIVES host Elyse Luray learns about the forgotten doctor who brought life-saving incubator technology to the United States at the turn of the 20th century. Lubin Photos - A contributor from Branford, Florida, inherited two bulging photo albums, dated 1914 to 1916, that contain hundreds of photos of old silent film stars and a behind-the-scenes look into an enormous film studio empire - not in Hollywood, but Philadelphia. She received the albums from a distant relative, Herbie Lubin. One of the books holds many Western scenes, including a cowboy character captioned "Herbert Lubin." Other captions refer to the Siegmund Lubin Studios. Who was Siegmund Lubin? And was Herbie a movie star? HISTORY DETECTIVES host Tukufu Zuberi takes viewers on an excursion through an early movie mogul's dramatic rise and fall. Navajo Rug - At auction, a contributor bought a rug whose woven designs intrigued him. A Southwest American history buff, he's fascinated by the rug's central figure of a man with a feathered head holding lightning bolts. He believes the figure was never meant to be captured by a loom. Did the weaver violate a taboo? Who wove the rug? HISTORY DETECTIVES guest host Eduardo Pagan meets with a Navajo medicine man and a traditional Navajo weaver and travels to Crownpoint, New Mexico, long considered the center of Navajo weaving. Finally, HISTORY DETECTIVES visits a textile historian to find out who may have been behind this controversial design.

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Sea of Creepy Monsters

The Lembeh Strait, located north of the Indonesian island of Sulawesi, is a hotspot of marine biodiversity. Countless amazing creatures thrive in the underwater landscape found here. Over a period of four years, two wildlife filmmakers captured hundreds of hours of footage including some behavior never-before caught on camera. For instance, they were able to shoot an anglerfish swallowing a lionfish - a scene resembling Godzilla gulping down Dracula! Welcome to the SEA OF CREEPY MONSTERS. In this fascinating documentary, macro cinematography brings viewers up-close with incredible creatures. Some of this sea life is barely visible to the naked eye, such as a gorgeously colored sea slug - just a few millimeters long, and the pigmy sea horse, which only grows to about two centimeters long. Some of these animals make themselves virtually undetectable by employing masterful camouflage. The filefish, for example, cleverly conceals itself among soft corals, moving with the rhythm of the water as if it were a part of the coral. The octopus masters an even more astonishing trick - changing its appearance not only by varying the color of its skin but also its texture. The Lembeh Strait also harbors many animals still unknown to science, including one of the world's rarest octopi - a quaint, hairy creature that can pass itself off as a bundle of fibrous algae. As the program title implies, there are also menacing species to be seen. These include a member of the frogfish family with a natural "fishing rod" attached to its body - actually, a flap of skin disguised as a tasty worm - which it uses to capture its unsuspecting prey! The mantis shrimp caught on film are called "thumb breakers" by fishermen as they can deliver a blow strong enough to break a bone. From elegant seahorses, to mantis shrimp and deadly mini-octopi, SEA OF CREEPY MONSTERS is that rare underwater documentary where the images remain long after the program has ended.