Now Day Week A-Z
Displaying: Thursday, Sep 24 for RMPBS - HD Early Morning  -  Morning  -  Afternoon  -  Evening
12:00am
12:30am
1:00am
1:30am
2:00am
2:30am
3:00am
3:30am
4:00am
4:30am
5:00am
5:30am
6:00am
6:30am
7:00am
7:30am
8:00am
8:30am
9:00am
9:30am
10:00am
10:30am
11:00am
11:30am
Xavier Riddle and the Secret Museum : I Am Mary Shelley/I Am Harry Houdini

I am Mary Shelley Xavier and the gang are excited for a Nature Troop campout, where Xavier has volunteered to tell the first campfire story. There's just one problem: everyone is expecting a spooky story, but Xavier only knows how to tell silly stories. What's he going to do? He doesn't want to disappoint everyone. To the Secret Museum! Our heroes are sent back in time to meet an expert spooky storyteller: Mary Shelley. Mary takes our trio on an imaginative playdate where she spins the leaves and wind into a very spooky tale, which Xavier can't help but turn funny. Is all hope lost?? Mary helps Xavier see that he can tell a story that's both spooky AND silly. The most important thing is to tell stories your own way. Curriculum: "Tell stories you own way." I am Harry Houdini The time has come from Brad to spend his very first night in the museum, and he couldn't be more excited. Except, when the lights go out, Brad realizes it's kind of... gulp... scary there at night. Too afraid to stay put in his sleeping bag, there's only one thing left to do... to the Secret Museum! Our heroes travel back in time to meet someone who knew how to face a scary situation: Harry Houdini. Harry wants nothing more than to be a brave performer, just like his hero, tightrope walker Fearless Jean. But, it turns out tightrope walking is scarier than he thought! Good thing Harry has a trick to help himself, and Brad, make it through to the end: when you're scared, take a deep breath to calm down and feel better. Curriculum: "When you're scared, you can take a deep breath to calm down and feel better."

12:00pm
12:30pm
1:00pm
1:30pm
2:00pm
2:30pm
3:00pm
3:30pm
4:00pm
4:30pm
5:00pm
5:30pm
6:00pm
6:30pm
7:00pm
7:30pm
8:00pm
8:30pm
9:00pm
9:30pm
10:00pm
10:30pm
11:00pm
11:30pm
The War : The Ghost Front

(December 1944-March 1945) By December 1944, Americans have become weary of the war their young men have been fighting for three long years; the stream of newspaper headlines telling of new losses and telegrams bearing bad news from the War Department seem endless and unendurable. In the Pacific, American progress has been slow and costly, with each island more fiercely defended than the last. In Europe, no one is prepared for the massive counterattack Hitler launches on December 16 in the Ardennes Forest in Belgium and Luxemburg. Tom Galloway of Mobile, Burnett Miller of Sacramento and Ray Leopold of Waterbury are there, among the Americans caught up in the biggest battle on the Western Front - the Battle of the Bulge. Back home, Katharine Phillips of Mobile and Burt Wilson of Sacramento are shocked to see newspaper headlines showing the Germans on the offensive and begin to wonder, "Are we losing now that we're this close?" Meanwhile, at Santo Tomas Camp in Manila, thousands of internees, including Sascha Weinzheimer of Sacramento, are now starving, desperately trying to hold onto life long enough to be liberated. At Yalta, Allied leaders agree on a plan to end the war that includes massive bombing raids aimed at German oil facilities, defense factories, roads, railways and cities. In March alone, Allied warplanes drop 163,864 tons of bombs on Germany - almost as much as they have dropped in the preceding three years combined. In the Pacific, Allied bombers are ready to batter Japan as well - but first, the air strip on Iwo Jima, an inhospitable volcanic island halfway between Allied air bases on Tinian and the Japanese home islands, needs to be taken. There the Marines, including Ray Pittman of Mobile, face 21,000 determined Japanese defenders, who, with no hope of reinforcement or re-supply, have been ordered to kill as many Americans as possible before being killed themselves. After almost a month of desperate fighting, the island is secured, and American bombers are free to begin their full-fledged air assault on Japan. In the coming months, Allied bombings will set the cities of Japan ablaze, killing hundreds of thousands and leaving millions homeless. By the middle of March 1945, the end of the war in Europe seems imminent. Hundreds of thousands of Americans are crossing the Rhine and driving into the heart of Germany, while the Russians are within 50 miles of Berlin. Still, back in Luverne, Al McIntosh warns his readers to keep their heads down and keep working "until there is no doubt of victory any more" because "lots of our best boys have been lost in victory drives before."