Now Day Week A-Z
Displaying: Monday, Dec 22 for KVCRDC 24.3 Desert Cities Channel Early Morning  -  Morning  -  Afternoon  -  Evening
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History Detectives

Shipwreck Cannons - Beachcombers on the Oregon Coast spotted what looked like large, rusty rocks sticking out of the sand. The state of Oregon, which has recovered the encrusted objects, believes they house priceless artifacts: cannons from the 1846 shipwreck of the USS Shark. The Shark and a few fast-sailing schooners like her were built in the 1820s to suppress slave traders and pirates. In 1846, the Shark was sent on what may have been her most challenging mission, to resolve the matter of the "Oregon question." In the Pacific Northwest, both the United States and Great Britain laid claim to large stretches of the Northwest Territories. The Shark's mission was to uncover intelligence on the British and their intentions, but the vessel met with disaster, sinking while attempting to cross the treacherous Columbia Bar. In Oregon and southwest Washington, HISTORY DETECTIVES host Gwendolyn Wright tracks the 162-year-old naval tale with the help of lead investigative archaeologists from the U.S. Navy and the state of Oregon. Connecticut Farmhouse - A resident of rural East Haddam, Connecticut, owns an old house that he believes has a story to tell. Between 1891 and 1906, the farm changed hands six times, and the names of the residents appear to be mostly Eastern European. The late 1800s marked the beginning of a mass immigration of Eastern European Jews to the United States. The majority of refugees came from Russia, after the assassination of Alexander II in 1881 set off violent anti-Jewish riots across the country. By 1893, about a million immigrants had entered the U.S. through major East Coast ports, especially New York. But why did so many newcomers end up in this particular Connecticut home, and what accounted for the high turnover? In Connecticut and New York City, HISTORY DETECTIVES host Elyse Luray explores the efforts of Jewish-American relief societies to support the Jewish agricultural community as it struggled to take root in a new land. Kahlil Gibran Painting - A contributor from Overland Park, Kansas, has an unsigned oil portrait of his grandfather, Najib Musa Diab, which he believes was painted by the Lebanese-American poet Kahlil Gibran, author of The Prophet. His grandfather was a contemporary of Gibran, whose poetry was published by the Arabic-language newspaper that Diab founded in Brooklyn, New York. HISTORY DETECTIVES host Tukufu Zuberi's investigation reveals the perplexing challenges Gibran and other Arab immigrants faced as they balanced their new American identities with loyalties to their native lands when World War I changed the Middle East map and policy. From this turmoil, Gibran found the unique blend of Eastern and Western philosophy that permeated his writing and art. Did this period in Gibran's life also produce Diab's portrait? HISTORY DETECTIVES heads to Savannah, Georgia, and New York City to find out.

Woodsongs : Celebration of the Music and Life of Pete Seeger

PETE SEEGER was a folk icon and musical hero to many including Michael Johnathon. Pete was Michael's neighbor and later would inspire him to become a folksinger. Pete's public Television show Rainbow Quest were the seeds on what would become WoodSongs. For this special broadcast of WoodSongs, Michael will be celebrating the life and music of Pete with a few close friends and artists. RIK PALIERI is a folksinger from Vermont. When he was fifteen, he taught himself the 5-string banjo from Pete Seeger's book. In the mid 70's he joined up with Pete and The Hudson River Sloop Singers and became a regular performer at Clearwater events. Back then, The Sloop Singers were a small rag tag army of singing environmentalists that often shared the stage with Pete. Rik's latest project is following the footsteps of the legendary "The Almanac Singers" made up of Woody Guthrie, Pete Seeger, Lee Hays & Mill Lampell. Rik and George Mann traveled down the same roads as the legendary "The Almanac Singers" did in the summer of 1941. Rik will be performing with Rick Nestler who is a musician, ships captain, songwriter, and actor. FRANK HAMILTON toured with the Pete in the Weavers in the early 1960s. He is co-founder of the Old Town School of Folk Music in Chicago, IL. MARK DVORAK is a folk singer, songwriter, teacher and touring musician. His roots are in Chicago, but for more than 25 years he has been traveling the country and Europe. Since 1998, Mark has toured and performed with WeaverMania! playing the role of Pete Seeger. WeaverMania! celebrates the sounds and songs of Pete's legendary folk group, The Weavers. Starting in March, he is conducting a new class "Pete Seeger & The Power of Song" at the Old Town School of Folk Music where Mark has taught since 1986. CHRIS WALZ spent three and a half years touring the world with the bluegrass band The Special Consensus. He has been at the Old Town School of Folk Music since 1996 and divides his time between performing and teaching. Chris performs with Mark in WeanerMania!

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Bob the Builder : Believe In Yourself

Super Scrambler - Scrambler has been reading a book about the super-hero machine, Super-Smasher, and decides he wants to be just like him. The team is ready to start building a milking shed for Daisy - Farmer Pickles' prize cow. Scrambler sees a picture of Super-Smasher hauling bricks, and decides he has to be strong too! After a few mistakes and scaring Daisy, Scrambler realizes he's not a Super-Machine! He's just plain old Scrambler. Once the milking shed is complete, Daisy is missing. Scrambler thinks about what he should do - not what Super-Smasher should do. Following Scrambler's lead, the machines slowly lead Daisy and another cow Delores back to the shed. Scrambler tells his friends Daisy and Delores can be... the Super-Milking-Team! Roley's Weather Rap - Bob is building a weather station for Brad Rad, and Roley is making up a surfing rap for Brad's weather announcements! Bob, Wendy and Dizzy begin to assemble the weather station. As they put together the different instruments, they find out more about the weather. Roley uses this information to devise a catchy rap, and races off to make his announcement. The weather station is now predicting a storm, which means Brad and the Kids are in danger, and it's all Roley's fault! Brad makes an announcement and the children swim in just before the storm arrives. The next day, Roley makes another weather announcement, instead of rapping, he delivers it plain and simple: which, he's learned, is much safer!

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History Detectives

Shipwreck Cannons - Beachcombers on the Oregon Coast spotted what looked like large, rusty rocks sticking out of the sand. The state of Oregon, which has recovered the encrusted objects, believes they house priceless artifacts: cannons from the 1846 shipwreck of the USS Shark. The Shark and a few fast-sailing schooners like her were built in the 1820s to suppress slave traders and pirates. In 1846, the Shark was sent on what may have been her most challenging mission, to resolve the matter of the "Oregon question." In the Pacific Northwest, both the United States and Great Britain laid claim to large stretches of the Northwest Territories. The Shark's mission was to uncover intelligence on the British and their intentions, but the vessel met with disaster, sinking while attempting to cross the treacherous Columbia Bar. In Oregon and southwest Washington, HISTORY DETECTIVES host Gwendolyn Wright tracks the 162-year-old naval tale with the help of lead investigative archaeologists from the U.S. Navy and the state of Oregon. Connecticut Farmhouse - A resident of rural East Haddam, Connecticut, owns an old house that he believes has a story to tell. Between 1891 and 1906, the farm changed hands six times, and the names of the residents appear to be mostly Eastern European. The late 1800s marked the beginning of a mass immigration of Eastern European Jews to the United States. The majority of refugees came from Russia, after the assassination of Alexander II in 1881 set off violent anti-Jewish riots across the country. By 1893, about a million immigrants had entered the U.S. through major East Coast ports, especially New York. But why did so many newcomers end up in this particular Connecticut home, and what accounted for the high turnover? In Connecticut and New York City, HISTORY DETECTIVES host Elyse Luray explores the efforts of Jewish-American relief societies to support the Jewish agricultural community as it struggled to take root in a new land. Kahlil Gibran Painting - A contributor from Overland Park, Kansas, has an unsigned oil portrait of his grandfather, Najib Musa Diab, which he believes was painted by the Lebanese-American poet Kahlil Gibran, author of The Prophet. His grandfather was a contemporary of Gibran, whose poetry was published by the Arabic-language newspaper that Diab founded in Brooklyn, New York. HISTORY DETECTIVES host Tukufu Zuberi's investigation reveals the perplexing challenges Gibran and other Arab immigrants faced as they balanced their new American identities with loyalties to their native lands when World War I changed the Middle East map and policy. From this turmoil, Gibran found the unique blend of Eastern and Western philosophy that permeated his writing and art. Did this period in Gibran's life also produce Diab's portrait? HISTORY DETECTIVES heads to Savannah, Georgia, and New York City to find out.

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