Now Day Week A-Z
Displaying: Monday, Oct 20 for KVCR FNX Digital 24.2 Early Morning  -  Morning  -  Afternoon  -  Evening
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Indian Country Diaries : A Seat at the Drum

In "A Seat at the Drum", journalist Mark Anthony Rolo (Bad River Ojibwe) seeks to learn how Native Americans in Los Angeles preserve a tribal identity, survive economically and cope with the pressures of assimilation in a challenging metropolis. His personal quest to come to terms with these issues leads him to meet Native community leaders, Indians relocated from reservations, boarding school students, Native business leaders and single parent families whose stories typify the experiences of urban Indians. As these characters tell how Indians in Los Angeles create community and retain a connection to their tribes; choose whether their language and traditions are relevant in the modern world; cope with mounting social problems and declining social services; and develop business empires fueled by gaming profits, Rolo is propelled toward a reckoning with his own identity. Rolo finds that though relocated Indians seem to lose their tribal identity, indigenous California tribes such as the Gabrieleno/Tongva and the Pechanga Band of Luiseno Indians strive to strengthen theirs. Original inhabitants of the LA Basin, the Gabrieleno/Tongva tribe grasp threads of their original birdsongs, traditional ways and history in an idealistic attempt to gain Federal recognition, and with that, the golden road that the Pechanga have achieved. The Pechanga, a dwindling band before the National Indian Gaming Act was passed, are now so prosperous that Governor Schwarzenegger looks to them and other gaming tribes to help bail out California debt. But what makes them Indian? Is a Federal I.D. number enough? Do the wealthy Indians bear responsibility for philanthropy toward the poor?

Indian Country Diaries : Spiral of Fire

"Spiral of Fire" takes author LeAnne Howe (Choctaw) to the North Carolina homeland of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians to discover how their fusion of tourism, community, and cultural preservation is the key to the tribe's health in the 21st century. Along the way Howe seeks to reconcile her own identity as the daughter of a Cherokee father she never knew. Howe's journey of discovery leads her to one of the most beautiful places in America where Cherokees manage their own schools, hospitals, cable company, tourist attractions and multi-million dollar casino. Yet, despite these successes, diabetes is rampant, racism erodes self-confidence, and greed threatens to divide the community. "Spiral of Fire" reveals the forces at work to restore health to the tribe. Forces such as that of Joyce Dugan, former school superintendent and principal chief, who has been instrumental in cultural preservation efforts by leading the tribe to purchase Kituwah, the original "mother" town of the Cherokee. And Corey Blankenship,a student who led a campaign to convince legislators to pass a bill to allow a land exchange with the National Park Service that will provide a site for badly needed new schools. As well as James "Bo" Taylor, a young father who leads the movement to revitalize the Cherokee language, and traditional songs, dances and spirituality. Howe learns that a strong sense of community binds the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians. Their strong sense of identity comes from knowing their history, strengths and weaknesses, and coming to terms with them. This realization encourages Howe's desire to accept her Cherokee identity and to forgive an absent father.